Tag Archives: Adelaide

Marvelous Monday

And just like that: Monday!

We had a whirlwind week (ummm… it seems like this is a real pattern here), and now that we’re finally home, in our little abode, it is all hitting me. My phone is buzzing and vibrating with photo tags, well wishes, comments, and a list- a list of gifts, cards, beautiful  messages lining cards all meant for Addie. In just 2 years my sweet angel has so many who love her, who celebrate her. For all the people who could be there and all those who wanted to be, I am thankful. How can one little girl have  such love surrounding her? As I type away, I am watching her sleep, and even with her eyes closed and her chest rising and falling, with her gentle snore… there is still the hint of her smile. Her happiness and her personality are always shining through- and this is why people are there. She’s a magnet to love. Our love. Your love. Thank you for celebrating our (almost) two year old with us!

#aisforadelaide #happybirthday #AddieisTwo

*  *  *

I forgot to update everyone on Addie’s growth (which we truly only chart from her specialists) in the last post about Delaware, so I wanted to share her stats here:
23 Months:
24.25 pounds
29 inches long
20.3 inch head circumference

As I plotted her newest numbers with the doctors on the most important CHART according to her doctors (weight for height), we came up with Addie being at -1 SD for her head, which really put to rest the concern for hydrocephalus because her head is slowing on its growth  pattern. For height, she’s at +1 SD, so she’s right above the mean, and for weight she’s right in the middle. When you see the numbers on a growth chart, her own growth chart, it’s pretty cool! Dwarfism is an umbrella diagnosis with many forms defining it, and I feel very fortunate to have so much research about Addie’s form to help guide us through her possible medical needs.

*  *  *

Lastly, some random to start your week off… Heather, a fellow blogger and advocate, contacted me regarding a cause close to her heart. As I read her story and web page, I felt the need to share the information with you. As a child, I remember my school spending a lot of money to renovate during Spring Break one year. When we came back, there was some discussion about asbestos and that’s what they were doing… as a kid, I had no idea what that meant, but loved that our tiny school had gone through a face lift. Reading Heather’s story brings me such peace- knowing that I was not exposed to something so terrible as so many are. Please read and share her story…

At age 36, I was diagnosed with mesothelioma just 3 ½ months after my first and only child, Lily, was born. I was given just 15 months to live unless I underwent a drastic surgery to remove my left lung. Miraculously, I beat the odds and I’m still here eight years later.

Asbestos is not banned in the US, yet it’s the only known cause of mesothelioma. I was exposed to asbestos through my fathers work jacket when I was just a little girl; my diagnosis came about 30 years later. Once diagnosed, most patients die within 2 years. I am one of few survivors who openly share their story and work to spread awareness regarding the dangers of asbestos.

In honor of Asbestos Awareness Week (April 1-7), I created a webpage dedicated to raising awareness. Although this week has passed, I would love to help educate and protect your readers from this preventable disease!

Here’s the link to my awareness page: mesothelioma.com/heather/awareness

#themoreyouknow

Have a beautiful week, Reader!

13 Comments

Filed under Marvelous Monday

Every Six Months…

We made it to Delaware… with minimal traffic- which always makes me happy! Being in the company of doctors who are so confident and can answer questions that I forgot I had, or that I never even thought of always calms my mind.

When we got into the room with Dr. Bober, we sat down and Addie started playing. We talked a lot about where she was developmentally, her walking, her sleep- the usual. We then talked about her ears- which are at the top of my worry list. With her tubes coming out and her infection, we came to the conclusion that she will, most likely, end of with another set. Also, interestingly enough, we discussed the idea that her adenoids could also come out. Our ENT, locally in Rhode Island, spoke about a 50% chance that if we remove the adenoids with another set of tubes that a recurrence of tubes would be unnecessary. Dr. Bober assured me that this number is not reflective of children with achondroplasia.

A new lesson in life.

So… we will check her ears in a few weeks, see if there is fluid in there, and then take it from there. Should fluid still be in there, we will check for swollen adenoids. Fluid, tubes. Fluid and swollen adenoids, tubes and adenoids. Plan of action- simple! Of course there are a million steps in between, but to have a start and an end point makes the middle ground a bit easier to navigate.

So we are moving out of the worry of hydrocephalus, as her soft spot is closed and she has no signs, as well as the concern for central apnea (which seemed to disappear after 6 months) and kyphosis because Miss A is up and walking… and her x-rays looked amazing! Hearing that her spine looks great is nothing short of wonderful news!

And what are we looking at now? The bowing in her legs, which is something Dr. Mackenzie really keeps an eye on. Obstructive apnea and being aware of the signs, such as snoring and bad sleep patterns. And we also have to be more conscious of ear infections, especially because Addie’s tubes fell out already… but we already talked about that! :)

Some interesting facts for expecting mamas:
We have a 2-3% chance of having another child with achondroplasia.
A Level 2 ultrasound after 30 weeks will give us answers if there are size concerns.
We could still have a child with dwarfism without knowing (just like with Addie!).
Bonus?
We aren’t concerned. Knowing what we know now, we are thrilled to be welcoming another baby into our family!

… and then Dr. Mackenzie. After we ended up doing acrobatic acts on the floor:

#aisforadelaide #babyyoga

#aisforadelaide #yoga #downwardfacingdog

Colleen and Mac came in to examine my sweet yoga girl. After a few looks at her, we took to the halls of DuPont for some walking action. Make that running! Knowing that she’s been falling sideways a lot, I was worried about her legs and knees… but thankfully her legs are just the way they are (for now). We are having x-rays done to make sure her legs are going in the right direction and, as usual, monitor if she has any pain or increased falling.  Addie does have the typical hyper-extension in her knees, but she also has hyper-mobility that causes her knees to arc sideways, which could be adding to her falls (but not bad per se).

As expected, we will be going back in 6 months (really 7) for her next set of appointments and are excited for what lies ahead. The best part of going to DuPont are the answers, the new knowledge and knowing that the next time we see these specialists we will have a whole new world opened to us. Given that we see the doctors every 6 months we are never given too much information that we worry for months to come, but we always leave with things to think about.

… we hope we can work with our insurance going forward and are looking to generate more information about United’s vendetta against major medical providers and bringing them back to Nemours! (Hello high hopes!)

Until then, We hope you had a wonderful Sibling Day… Addie loved giving her soon-to-be baby sibling a kiss while we were on a beautiful family walk:

#aisforadelaide #siblingday2014

16 Comments

Filed under Achondroplasia

Marvelous Monday

I seriously cannot believe it’s Monday. I feel like we didn’t get a weekend- it was so jam-packed! …and while I am certainly stressed out and frazzled from the festivities, it’s the best feeling in the world.

I usually have a format… thankful dwarfism random that I follow, but this week, I have two thankful-s and no random. I know. I live on the wild side- even breaking my own rules!

SO this week, I am thankful for all the medical wonders we have at hand. While it is not my story, I will say that my newest nephew, Beckett James, has arrived. As I would expect any child of my bestie would be, he has a bit of a flare for the dramatic and didn’t make his entry into this world easy. But he is here. My beautiful (by everything but blood) sister is not only doing well, but looking like a super model, and they are heading home today. I spent much of my weekend running between birthday celebrations and the hospital, and I feel so tired but so energized at the same time. That feeling of holding new life. The one-on-one time of a new baby, in the quiet of the night (sure, I stayed a bit beyond visiting hours), talking to my friend. About our parents, about the future, about our families, and plans and and and. It was like a sleep over, with cooing and sweet baby breath. I took photos as my nephew took his first bath, and we laughed at re-learning to change a diaper (we both have girls for our first babes). This experience made me wish I lived closer to my big sister in Florida, wishing I could have been by her side, and also brought about such a deep love for this woman who mustered all of her love and strength to bring sweet Beckett into the world. I’m so excited for the next chapter!

And what else could I be thankful  for this week, if not the amazing women who rallied behind me almost 2 years ago through Rhode Island New Moms Connection? These women have given me so much love and support, and having them surround us to celebrate Addie’s second birthday (a little early) meant so much to us. We played, ate delicious pizza and mini cupcakes, and then played a bit more… and I watched as each child made connections to the others- all of whom they have known for their entire lives. Many of the kids ran up to other parents, giving hugs and kisses, because we all know each other. We all have a bond with each other- those first few weeks of motherhood that we spent together sitting on a floor with our new babies, trying to make sense of what we were doing right, and what we needed to change. Having those same women beside me… that’s what keeps me going. But there’s more. There are the moms I know from other personal experiences… like a friendship kindled over a wedding gown, flourishing through a love of hockey and sharing a first pregnancy! And friends from our cherished LPA community who made the hike to play, and pick up good conversation like we’d just spoken last week. A comfort and bond brought to us by a shared difference, making us  common- but a friendship we grow together watching our kids enjoy Life.

#aisforadelaide #birthdayparty #hangingaround

Just hanging around (BY HERSELF!!!!!). She’s come a long way in 2 years!

I have been blessed by my experiences, no matter how frazzling they may be, because they have brought me right here. To you. What will happen this week that will test you, but also teach you, nourish you and grow you? I hope  you find those moments and smile.

*  *  *

And what’s new in the dwarfism community this week? The LPA National Conference registration opened on the first!!! I would love to know what families will be there this year! We are so excited to meet new people, explore California and learn as much as we can at the workshops! Stay tuned to the blog for my conference tips later this month!

Lots of love to you this beautiful Spring week!
xo,

10 Comments

Filed under Marvelous Monday

Adelaide has achondroplasia

Adelaide was born after a lengthy labor on April 17, 2012. She was perfect. Beaming up through eyes that spoke of wonder. We swaddled her and held on for hours. It felt like we could not sleep. She was too much to let go of- her small body (18″) was a ball of cuddles that we’d waited almost 39 weeks to hold.

As the weeks passed, I noticed she didn’t look like the other babies in my new moms group. She was… rounder. She was happy, and a great sleeper, but she wasn’t the same as the other babies and I couldn’t put my finger on it. Each morning as I dressed her, I saw that her clothes fit oddly, and her head struggled to fit in her onesies.

Her head is big, I remember saying to her pediatrician’s nurse as she took measurements at her two month appointment. Addie was 9 weeks… and the ball had suddenly been put in motion.

When the doctor came into the room to examine Addie, she took two looks at the measurements and whipped out her own tape measure. She looked Addie over, asked me some questions, and cooed at her tiny patient.

What was happening? I wasn’t sure. But my stomach was in my throat,

You’re right, she confirmed about Addie’s head. It was bigger, but she was also measuring a bit small. To be safe, the pediatrician ordered an ultrasound of her head and x-rays of Addie’s long bones (arms and legs) to make sure everything was working as they should be, to be performed the following Monday, but we didn’t make it that far. A few hot days later with a lethargic infant and incessant fever, Addie was admitted to our local children’s hospital. An emergency CT of her head was performed to make sure there was no abnormal fluid in her head- this called for multiple spinal taps to be attempted unsuccessfully (and without anesthesia of any kind) to check for meningitis. Due to her high level of dehydration, the tests were lacking enough fluid, and we were left to give her broad spectrum antibiotics.

Panicked, I called my mom (250 miles away) who hopped in her car and started the drive up.

Because the tests were already on the table, while admitted, Addie got her x-rays and ultrasound done. After hearing that her head and brain were fine and there were no signs of hydrocephalus, we were wheeled back to her room to wait. I tried to sleep, to read, to do something, but I was stuck in a whirlwind of what-ifs.

I’d read it all… so when a woman came in who introduced herself as a geneticist, I knew we were looking at something serious. I listened to her introduce herself and say that she just wanted to stop by and check in on us. She was asked to look at Addie’s x-rays… I stopped listening, but then  she stood up, shook our hands and left.

Photo: Dimery Photography

Photo: Dimery Photography

I tried to nurse Addie, who was still having trouble eating, so I resorted to the pump. As I stood at the hospital room sink, burning my hands in the water, I looked up in the mirror to see the geneticist walk back in. I stayed there, forgoing the pain of the water for a minute. The look on her face was a nervous smile, not that of a confident woman. I sat down. I was prepared… but numb. The woman in front of me talked about the x-rays, the best doctors in Rhode Island, thorough examination…

Adelaide has Achondroplasia.

My husband asked what that was, but before he could finish his questions, I blankly said dwarfism.

I cried. A lot. I didn’t know enough about what was happening. Was this why she was sick? Would she be ok?

As it turned out, her dehydration was unrelated. She wasn’t great at latching, the summer was hot, and she had spiked a fever. That was why she was sick. Dwarfism was not an issue here.

In fact, here we are 2 years later, and dwarfism isn’t an issue anywhere. Some things are different- that’s for sure. Addie is a pro at staying still for x-rays, falling asleep with things attached to her head and body (sleep study), she can travel hundreds of miles by car without much issue to get to and from her geneticist in Delaware, and she’s encouraged to climb objects to get what she needs (where as other kids are told not to!).

When I think back to those days in the hospital, the fear and the unknowns, they scare me- how could I know so little about my own child? But they also serve as a reminder that what is different is not bad- difference is something to be celebrated and advocated. Our lives are different from most, of course… but it’s an amazing life. And that’s what means the most.

16 Comments

Filed under Achondroplasia

Marvelous Monday

Another week has passed and another is beginning. And I am thankful for that. Many of my friends have been going through first losses in life- mostly grandparents- and have emailed me asking for advice… how to move on, get over it, stop crying. I know they ask because I lost my brother, grandfather, 18 year old cousin, father, uncle and multiple friends before the age of 21… my grandmother passed away a few hours before I needed to be in work. I still went. I sold 2 gowns before my boss asked me what was up. When I told her, she began to tear up and told me to go home. Dave and I have a cruel joke: I met his family through weddings. He met mine through funerals. When it comes to funerals, I’m an old pro at 29… and as the years have passed, my coping skills have changed, though not the steps to heal.

What are my steps?

1. Let it happen.
The  tears, the anger, the hurt, the pain, the laughter that makes you guilty to have, the fear of all the memories you think are fading, the idea that you can’t remember  certain facial features or their voice. Just let it happen.

This Monday just being thankful is enough. Telling people to enjoy every moment of their lives is disingenuous. There are things that are not enjoyable- that is life. However, reminding ourselves after a long day, a particularly trying day, that we are still here, to heal the hurts we may have made and mend the fences that we can, is all we can do. It never gets easier when we lose the ones we love, but it grows different in us. The things we thought we forgot? They come back. After 15 years, I suddenly started to hear my Dad’s voice in my dreams again. It’s not as deep as I thought it was, but there it is- clear as a bell- lulling me back into a dream I might otherwise have  awoken from.

Here’s to another week. Live. Love. Laugh. And, damn it, cry if you need to!

*  *  *

This week, my brief, but important dwarfism fact is more of a life lesson to all. Be conscious of your words. When approaching a difference, so not assume that everyone who is different is suffering. Very few people I know choose to describe their everyday as suffering. I embrace the fact that dwarfism is considered a disability. I do not fear what is fact- I choose to learn how we can improve and change our society to better include everyone- regardless of differences. What I choose to change also includes perception. My daughter smiles… All. The. Time. Even when we were told her right ear was pretty infected on Saturday, she was all smiles. In general, she is a tough cookie, but like most kids she lives a happy life. It is… well, it’s normal. How so? She’s never known anything different- and that, by definition of the word and subjective experience. The welts that make other parents cringe, the therapies, the extra appointments- that’s life. That’s not suffering. Suffering should be held sacred for the hardest moments in life- those that truly make us question the world. Suffering is not being different.

Please, choose your words wisely.

*  *  *

And last but not least, my random for the week. Again, words. My friend, we will call him C, works a fairly stressful job. It’s all people-relations and working with clients. Pleasing those that have too much money to spend, or too little and spend too much- a fine line between fun and babysitting for adults. He’s also a homeowner, small business owner and landlord. In short, he’s no fool. At his place of business, however, he’s often disrespected- even by well meaning customers who feel like they’ve made some kind of quick friendship and thus make an innapropriate remark or joke.

On one such occasion this weekend someone told him he needed to grow a thicker skin. He’s a funny guy, blue eyes, Italian, well-educated, a little over 6 feet with a good sense of humor and healthy respect for himself and others… but to this comment he replied that his skin was thick enough, perhaps he simply deserved some respect. While you think your words are innocent and that you’re in the right, remember his thought.

Happy Monday, Reader! May your week be full of thanks, love and respect.

love,

10 Comments

Filed under Marvelous Monday

She’s Genetically Modified Already

When it comes down to it, we spend very little. Almost insanely little each month… but what we do spend, is spent well. Like healthy food for instance.

Addie is genetically modified. She’s the perfect creation from a spontaneous genetic mutation of the FGFR3 gene, resulting in achondroplasia. What she’s not made for, what no child is made for, are the GMOs, pesticides that kill insects from the inside out and the chemicals made to produce expedited growth and thus the demise of thousands (millions?) of animals each year.

Though we could choose cable, or newer cars, faster internet, fancier phones, better clothes and perhaps a vacation, we choose daily living. We choose everyday to be a beautiful bridge to the next, and hold to our beliefs that food is fuel, and though should be enjoyed (of course!) should also be practical; limiting snacks and dairy and eliminating as much added sugars and dyes as possible.

But, I’m not here to give you a lecture… in fact, I just wanted to share a list with you! Many people know what the “Dirty Dozen” are, but very few are aware of the “Clean 15″. While I love shopping organic, we just can’t afford everything to be that way (wouldn’t that be ideal, though?). So, here are the Clean 15 (remember that farming standards change every year, so be sure to check your local area and check the web for yearly updated information):

#aisforadelaide #clean15 #organic #cleaneating #healthyfamily

We are excited for the summer farmers’ markets, fruit stands and farm picking, but also do our due diligence, looking for organic standards and asking questions- not all things sold in pretty, recyclable packaging is organic… and the word natural means NOTHING. Literally, nothing. Berries are natural whether they are sprayed with chemicals or not. Be aware. Make the best decisions you can… and save some money when you can, too! I hope knowing that there is a clean list is just as helpful as the dirty list- I know having some peace of mind while shopping always means a lot to me.

Lots of love and health to you and your family in these last few months of winter,

13 Comments

Filed under Community, Parenting/Family/Lifestyle

My letter to you

My sweet baby girl,

I haven’t written in a while, but I know we express our love to each other every day. From the moment you wake up and find yourself rolled up between me and Daddy to the times you beg for a “kish” as I’m struggling to finish dinner. All these moments wrapped up into each 24-hour time period together make my heart swell bigger and bigger at the close of each day. I swear, sometimes I close my eyes and my chest hurts from the love that is so smooshed into my body- the love that you’ve shown me. The love that Daddy possesses for you- the smile that beams across his face, no matter the worry that is buried in his heart.

You’re amazing.

For all the times I cannot stop what I am doing and you just need “uppahs mama, peese!”… thank you for understanding that being strapped onto me is the only way it can happen. For running your tiny fingers through my hair and resting your head into my neck. For giving small kisses to my shoulders and playing with my earrings.

#aisforadelaide #babywearing #thisislove

Thank you for teaching me that innocence is something to embrace, not break. The unknown is not scary… in fact, it can be a blessing.

I love you so much,
Mom

2 Comments

Filed under Dear Adelaide

Marvelous Monday 2014!!!!

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Now that’s out of the way, onto our usual MM post (thankful, dwarfism, random)… Hold onto your hats. It’s gonna be a long one!

This week I am thankful for the 2 weeks Addie and I have had with Dave. Yes. TWO weeks. We left for Philadelphia on the Saturday before Christmas and we got back to RI the following one. Dave headed into work for Monday and half of Tuesday, had New Year’s Day off, then Hercules dropped some snow on us and Dave was home Thursday and Friday. As he heads into work today, I hope he feels the relief of being back to a schedule.

#aisforadelaide #hercules #newengland #snowstorm2014 #blog #asnowday in the Martinka house

Since his time off I have not gotten out of bed before 9am. Most days, not before 10… and there were a few 11′s in there. True story. I ate a hot breakfast almost everyday. I showered more than twice a week. I dried my hair, by myself. I did my nails, put on a face mask or two, deep conditioned my hair, read half a book, caught up on reading some of my favorite blogs and resumed some semblance of a daily workout. This refreshing end/start to the year(s) was so important to getting my head on straight… and brings me to other things to be thankful for- like the way Dave has changed and his awesome boss.

Spending time alone with Addie when she was an infant was hard for anyone but me- her sole provider of food and the one who understood each cry and sound. Now that she’s (incredibly) vocal, understands requests and direction and eats pretty much anything that’s not nailed down, I find myself alone when Dave is home. Off on some adventure, Dave steals Addie while I sleep to make food, run errands, or read stories in her bedroom. We both give each other the eye in some strange competition of Who Will Be The One She Wants to Put Her to Sleep Tonight. When she’s hurting, Daddy can heal her pain and when she needs snuggles at night, she often begs for Daddy to rescue her from the crib. While it is nice to not have to get up at 4am, I’ve found myself pushed to the edge of the bed, sad. I miss the days she needed me so much.

#aisforadelaide What happens when Dave doesn't work #blog

Then there is the look. The look of peace and warmth. It’s what Dave’s face looks like, even at 6:30am when hungah spews over and over from the mouth of a half-awake toddler into the open space of our room. When she cries waahwaah hungah nanaaah and he hops up and asks, “you’re ready for breakfast, Bug?” There is the look of total contentment. Whatever happens to a woman to feel the love she does for her young happens to a man, too. I’ve seen it first-hand.

#aisforadelaide #blog #weekend

I’m also incredibly blessed that Dave’s boss recognized that his employees come in by train from Boston and from 50 miles away by car, and decided to cancel work before the snow hit. With a few calls and some research, Dave stayed on top of the tail-end of his work week from the safety and warmth (and yet, drafts?) of home. For a job he stumbled upon with a start-up just 3 years ago, his career is blossoming in ways we never could have foreseen.

*  *  *

And so she grows. No really. I just wrote about this on a post of the same name: AND SO SHE GROWS, AND SO SHE GROWS. If you know Billy Joel, you will see my play on words from And So it Goes, and you may recognize the true heartache that comes with watching your child grow up mature. When Addie was diagnosed, we were warned about all the things she would never do and we were told of all the milestones we would miss. We were given predictions about her height and told she had to be on a hard surface always and most toys were a no-go and her balance would be bad… and so on. And after all that, I was overwhelmed and sad. We got rid of bouncers and carriers and sleepers. I found toys that were good for her, but not always mature enough. And I didn’t know where to go. As a new mom to a special needs child, I wish I’d known all of THIS.

But I didn’t, and I wasn’t prepared for a doctor to be wrong. But she was. Not because all babies with dwarfism do walk before 36 months, although many do, or because she’s not as small as I once believed she would be, or that she has decent balance. No. I wasn’t prepared because I got lost in a negative world. I don’t always see Addie as growing up… she doesn’t always gain an up, but she does grow in her intelligence, in her beauty, in her love and understanding and in her compassion. Initially I was worried I would hinder her into a sheltered life- one where I would hide all the bad. And becoming CPL didn’t help that fear. But then I saw. I saw her say “HI!” to everyone she meets, and wave with an exuberant “BYE PEOPLE”, as we exit any given location. I have witnessed her love, as I cook dinner and she reaches around my leg with a hug and a pat and whispers love you, mama so gently into the back of my knee. She loves me, without prompting or pressure, without even seeing my face, she buries her own into my leg and expresses her own emotion.

Do I protect her? Yes. Just as I will put a helmet, and knee and elbow pads on her to ride a bike. Just as many parents do. I didn’t wear knee or elbow pads and my helmet surely did not fit as well as they do now… does that mean my parents didn’t care? Am I just over-protective? Should she never ride a bike?

I could wrack my brain forever. I could worry about all the things you might think of how I parent, or how your neighbor might feel about me, or that dude who anonymously comments on my posts in the most negative of lights. But then, I wouldn’t be parenting, I would be absorbed in my thoughts about everyone else’s thoughts. So, let’s call it a truce. Let’s make a pact.

This blog was started with the intention to education about dwarfism, but if I focus on dwarfism alone, I will alienate myself and you. I will become obsessed, immersed in so many details that I will come to define Adelaide as a person with dwarfism, and not just see her difference as a part of her. I will come to define all people with dwarfism as just that, and if I do that, I will only see myself as a white woman. That will be who I am.  But it’s not. And so, this blog will continue to educate, advocate, spread awareness and push buttons. I will share stories of change and some of adversity. And here’s the best part: I don’t care what you think. While I would love your support and hope you stay to read more posts, what I crave is equality. For my child, for your child. I seek name calling, bullying and fear of the unknown to become a thing of the past. Ask questions- all of them. I want to answer. I want to know your fears so that I may assuage them. I want you to know what terms are accepted to call a person with dwarfism, and I want you to know that you do not have the right to dictate what others feel. Neither do I. On this blog, the m-word will not be tolerated, whether you’re speaking of pickles or humans or anything in between. The word? Midget. And that’s the end. Those are my feelings, on my blog that I write.

So, I won’t judge you, on your blog, should you choose to write one, and you will not judge me.

x_______________________________________________
      emotionally sign here

*  *  *

You’re still with me? I hope so!

I wanted to recap last year’s resolutions (only 3), which I found when I named my resolution post this year: THIS YEAR, I RESOLVE. Somehow I picked the same name, two years in a row, without trying. I guess it’s a series, now!

From last year’s POST:

1. Be nice (to me): Yeah. That. Well… I am better, and I don’t bash myself in front of Addie, ever, but recently I’ve noticed my sweet girl pointing to the scale and saying, “mama.” So, clearly, I still need to work on that. I wish I could take the scale away, but I truly believe it is useful- especially for long runs. I weigh myself before and after to make sure I am not dehydrated. I also check my weight more often than I should, but now I need to be aware of not doing this while Addie is awake. I think this is something many women need to work on, and clearly I am still trying to justify my need for a scale. Regardless, though I am nice-r to myself, in no way am I nice.

2. Know when to hold ‘em: So I still like to fight, but Dave and I are good about holding our tongues and I try to not speak to him in sarcastic tones because I truly do not want Addie to pick that nasty habit up! This is something I am still working on, but I think I will always have to be conscious of my words and actions as I’m a bit of a sailor-mouth with a temper.

3. Earn it to own it: Nailed it! I took time for myself each day to write and came up with 269 posts last year. This year I aim to write posts with just as much heart as ever… and add some time to take care of my fitness goals, too!

So there it is… Monday! I hope you have a beautiful week, Reader!!

xo

30 Comments

Filed under Marvelous Monday

The New Year’s Resolutions List… as told by a toddler

Mom and I have been having serious conversations about life recently. I’ve learned that picking my nose isn’t funny, even though everyone laughs- I don’t get it… so I keep doing it. I also learned I can say “no”. And YES, I like to say NO often! With all this in mind, here are my resolutions:

#aisforadelaide #happynewyear #2014 Let your star shine!

1. Stop eating food off the floor. Sure I will… just like I’ll stop putting the dog’s paw in my mouth or everything else in plain sight. (This is like mom saying she won’t eat the batter when she’s making cake… never. gonna. happen.)

2. I’m working on not telling everyone in public that my mama does peepee. But who is she to hide such truths? My diaper swells ten-fold when I pee, you don’t see me embarrassed!

3. I hope to enjoy more veggies and ease up on the fruit intake… for all our sakes.

4. I resolve to add an ‘r’ to “shirt”. No really, I’m working on it. Mom says she is, too.

5. I’m going to continue to be a genius. I’m slowly proving that the true struggle in life is trying to outwit a toddler.

6. Attempt to say “hi” to stranger prior to launching myself at them in a quest for a kiss.

7. Remember that my feet are not often at the same pace as my desires.

8. Stay happy. Stay innocent.

9. Continue to teach my parents how to enjoy the minor details and leave the big stuff to work itself out.

10. Stay true to me.

What are your resolutions for 2014?

Happy NYE!
xo,
2E9B6BA594191CB39EE4DF9A71E4589C

 

6 Comments

Filed under Parenting/Family/Lifestyle

Filled with Thanks

23 Comments

Filed under Community, Educate/Adovocate/Make Change